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More reasons to JOIN the Silvercore Club!

Announcement August 8, 2019

On Sunday, July 28th, we hosted our second annual Silvercore member event at The Vancouver Gun Club, and we created a video to highlight the day! 

At the event, we shot sporting clays, ate Huli Huli chicken (check out the recipe here), and gave away some fantastic prizes from various local businesses.

These local companies make everything possible, so be sure to show them some love by checking out their websites:

Now, onto you, our Silvercore members. Where do we even begin! We wouldn’t be where we are today without your constant support, and we thank all of you who attended our event on the 28th. Many of you had never shot sporting clays before the event, and we’re so happy you came out and tried something new, fun was had by all. 

Our events aim to bring together the shooting, outdoor, and hunting world so that we continually work towards creating a unified community that learns, explores, celebrates, and works together.

Couldn’t make it on the 28th? Not to worry, we’ll be hosting another one next year! Now, sit back, relax, and enjoy the video highlights from our 2019 event.

Silvercore 2019 Member Event Video

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Pro Tips to pass your CFSC/CRFSC Canadian Firearms Safety Course

Announcement May 22, 2019

Over the past 25 years, to date, of not only teaching the Canadian Firearms Safety Course and Restricted Firearms Safety Course but also training and certifying the majority of current instructors in our area, we have arrived at some simple truths that will assist anyone looking to pass their course with high marks.

Firearms are a lot of fun, but only when you, and those around you, are safe and responsible. As with any activity that carries with it an inherent risk if not properly adhered to, passing your test should not be the final destination of your journey, but rather the first milestone that you should look to surpass with the highest level of confidence and ability. To that end, comes tip number one, which is:

Prepare prior to attending your in-person training

The absolute best and easiest way to fully prepare for your in-person training is by taking theSilvercore Online Firearms Safety Course. This course was created to take the student from start to finish covering every concept required to pass the CFSC and CRFSC. Every section is broken down into easy to digest sub-sections comprised of videos, presentations and review tests. You can take the online course at your leisure, on any web-enabled platform, and you not locked into a rigid learning structure but rather you can navigate through in any order you wish with the ability to re-take sections as often as you would like. The system will track your progress and issue you with a verifiable graduation certificate.

We have seen the massive success in our students who have taken the online course and we have also seen the online course used by businesses and individuals who are not interested in obtaining their licence but require the knowledge and proficiency testing it provides. In order to obtain your licence,  you will still need to attend your in-person course, but now your attention can be put 100% towards handling the different training firearms with the instructor’s guidance.

We have also created a free playlist on our YouTube channel which will quickly show you how to prove all of the action types that you will be tested on, watch here.

Finally, physical copies of the course manuals are available for purchase, or online for free at:https://bit.ly/2QjGpKX

Know your ACTS and PROVE

Canada borrowed heavily from existing safety programs when developing its training standards andUS Marine Colonel Jeff Cooper’s 4 universal safety principleswere adapted into what Canada refers to as ACTS and PROVE.A – Assume every firearm is loaded – You don’t even need to touch the firearm to do this. Even if someone you trust has assured you that the firearm isn’t loaded, if ends up in your hands, it’s your responsibility to check.

C – Control the muzzle direction at all times- This is the mostcrucial of all of the safety principles. The firearm should always be pointed in a direction that should it discharge, there would be no injury as well as minimal to no property damage.

T – Keep your finger off of the trigger and outside of the trigger guard- Unless you have made the conscious decision to shoot a firearm, your finger should not only be off the trigger but clearly outside of the trigger guard for everyone else to see.S – See that the firearm is unloaded, PROVE it safe. 

After ACTS, we believe the RCMP Firearms Program really liked the idea of another acronym when they came up with PROVE. While we are all for creating redundancy in safety training, the first 4 letters are already covered with the final letter, E, being the only unique step. That said, it is an important part of the safety course and something you should be comfortable demonstrating.

P – Point the firearm in the safest available direction- This should be done when we controlled the muzzle direction.

R – Remove all cartridges- This should be done when we saw the firearm to be unloaded.

O – Observe the chamber- This should be done when we saw the firearm to be unloaded.

V – Verify the feeding path- This should be done when we saw the firearm to be unloaded.

E – Examine the bore- Ensure that there are no obstructions in the bore of the firearm. This is preferably done with a cleaning rod or some other bore observing device.

Come to class with a desire to learn

We know this sounds silly, but every once in a while we find there are students who have paid to attend the course, but seem more interested in their Instagram posts or talking about non-course related topics rather than actually learning.  Some students have prior knowledge and experience with firearms and view the training as simply a formality, or nuisance to endure. Often times it is these same students who have the most difficulties when it comes to passing the course.

Some of the content found in the CFSC and CRFSC is unique to those courses, and even having a fair bit of knowledge in the subject matter would not prepare you for course-specific test questions. Having grown up using firearm from a very young age, and working in the firearms community for over 25 years (even longer if you count child labour at gun shows), I still learning new things on a regular basis. Remember, your instructor knows exactly what is needed for you to be successful in your training, so take advantage of that knowledge.

Don’t point the firearm at others and keep your finger off the trigger

Controlling the muzzle direction really is the cardinal rule with firearms. As Jeff Cooper would say, do not point the firearm at anything you are not willing to destroy.  Even if you violate all of the other safety principles, but at least adhere to this one, the firearm could discharge but at least nobody was hurt. If you were to point a firearm at yourself or another during your test, it is an automatic fail. 

As for your trigger finger, it isn’t enough to simply keep it off of the trigger, you will need to keep it clearly outside of the trigger guard so that the instructor can see daylight through the trigger guard.  Yes, aside from actively firing the gun when you have made that conscious decision, there can be times when a finger would need to be put on a trigger of a firearm that has been proven to be unloaded (such as removing a bolt, or disassembling some firearms), but for the test, keep the finger away from the trigger.

Handle all of the firearms your instructor has brought

Every once in a while, we find a student who just figures they already know how all firearms work. We are constantly learning new things about firearms, and that only happens through our willingness to learn. Perhaps you have used that same make and model of firearm in the past and figure the one you are being tested on will work in the same way only to learn that it doesn’t.  Or perhaps the process of disabling the firearm for training purposes, or having the classroom firearms be handled by numerous other students, has introduced some peculiarities you wouldn’t otherwise find. Take your time and make sure you are comfortable handling every action. If you aren’t, ask the instructor to assist you.

Ask questions if you are unclear

Don’t be shy to ask questions.  You are there to learn and asking questions is how we learn. Chances are, if you are thinking about it, likely others in the class are also wondering, but they may be too shy to ask.  You can ask your questions in front of the group, or take the instructor aside if it’s something you wish to ask in private. Trust me, if your instructor is worth their salt they will definitely welcome the questions.

nces are, if you are thinking about it, likely others in the class are also wondering, but they may be too shy to ask.  You can ask your questions in front of the group, or take the instructor aside if it’s something you wish to ask in private. Trust me, if your instructor is worth their salt they will definitely welcome the questions.

Testing

Each course has a 50 question, multiple choice and true/false quiz, as well as practical handling testing. If you don’t understand a question on the written test, make a mark beside it and move on to your next question.  At the end of the test, if you still don’t know what is being asked you can ask your instructor for clarification. Remember, your instructor can assist with comprehension issues but they can not lead you to an answer or provide examples of what the incorrect answer is. The time for teaching is during a course and not during a test and your instructor risks invalidating their ability to teach should they not adhere to these rules. 

For the practical test, take your time and adhere to the ACTS and PROVE.  Some students find that verbalizing their actions through the practical test assists them in not missing points and helps the instructor by giving some insight into what the students thought process is. If you adhered to the principles relayed above, you will be more than prepared when it comes to testing and you will have the confidence required to successfully pass your course.

For a visual explaining of this blog post head to our YouTube page! Make sure to like and subscribe. 


Below are some links that referenced in this post and will assist you with your endeavour:

Order the absolute best CFSC / CRFSC pre-training resource created by Master Instructors:https://bit.ly/2M4TTvB. If you purchase this at the same time as your in-person course at Silvercore you can get $39 in savings! It also guarantees a free retest. 

Student Handbook– Canadian (Restricted) Firearms Safety Course Handbook

PROVE Videos:Silvercore YouTube Channel– don’t forget to subscribe!

PAL application form:Possession & Acquisition License (PAL) Application Form

CFSC / CRFSC Online Theory– If you purchase this with your in-person course you can get $39 in savings! It also guarantees a free retest. This is optionaland not a requirement prior to your course

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What to do with your 12-6 Prohibited Firearms

Announcement May 22, 2019

There are three general classifications of firearms in Canada, non-restricted, restricted and prohibited.  

  1. Non – Restricted – Generally rifles and shotguns
  2. Restricted – Generally handguns
  3. Prohibited – Guns that are deemed to be not allowedfor several reasons including function and design (i.e. full auto, short barrel, etc.)

According to theCriminal Code,a prohibited firearm is:

  • a handgun that:
    • has a barrel equal to or less than 105 mm in length
    • is designed or adapted to discharge a 25 or 32 calibre cartridge, but does not include any such handgun that is prescribed, where the handgun is for use in international sporting competitions governed by the rules of the International Shooting Union
  • a firearm that is adapted from a rifle or shotgun whether by sawing, cutting or any other alteration, and that, as so modified is:
    • Less than 660 mm in length, or
    • 660 mm or greater in length and has a barrel less than 457 mm in length
  • an automatic firearm, whether or not it has been altered to discharge only one projectile with one pressure of the trigger
  • any firearm that is prescribed to be a prohibited firearm

The fascinating thing is, as with many rules, there are exceptions.  If, for example, an individual legally owned a firearm before it was delegated as prohibited, they could be grandfatheredand permitted to not only retain that firearm but also acquire other firearms in that classification. 

Under section 12 of the firearms act, individuals with the following designations on their PAL can legally be in possession of the following:

  • s.12(2) – fully automatics
  • s.12(3) – converted automatics
  • s.12(4) – firearms prohibited by former prohibition order No. 12
  • s.12(5) – firearms prohibited by former prohibition order No. 13
  • s.12(6) – handguns with a barrel length of 105 mm or less or that discharge .25 or .32 calibre ammunition. 

“On licences issued on or after April 10, 2005, these firearms will be referred to as 12(6.1) firearms.”

As the vast majority of PAL holders that have prohibited status are those of the 12-6 variety, this article is to discuss what a person can do with those firearms.

First the good news, unlike some prohibited firearms, you can take your 12-6 firearms to the range and shoot them.

Question:Can I take my prohibited firearms to a shooting range? 

Answer: You may transport a prohibited handgun that discharges .25 or .32 calibre ammunition, or that has a barrel length of 105 mm or less to a range. Other prohibited firearms may no longer be transported to a shooting range. However, they can be transported for other purposes, such as a change of residence, a change of ownership, export, repair, participation in a gun show, or lawful disposal.

We already mentioned that the firearm could be transferred to another individual with the same licence conditions on their PAL, but did you know that if you or someone you are related to own a prohibited 12-6 firearm it can be transferred to a next of kin as outlined in section 12-7 of the firearms act:

Next of kin of grandfathered individuals-(7) A particular individual is eligible to hold a licence authorizing the specific individual to possess a particular handgun referred to in subsection (6.1) that was manufactured before 1946 if the particular individual is the spouse or common-law partner or a brother, sister, child or grandchild of an individual who was eligible under this subsection or subsection (6) to hold a licence authorizing the individual to possess the particular handgun.

As there are only a limited number of people who can be in possession of prohibited firearms in Canada, the market for selling them is pretty dry and, unless there is historical or collectible significance, very often owners are unable to sell these firearms for much, or anything at all in Canada which brings us to our next option of selling them outside of Canada. 

For prohibited firearms, you will need to apply for an export permit through Global Affairs Canada,and you will also need to notify the RCMP Registrar so that they are aware the firearm is no longer going to be registered to you.

Remember, when exporting a firearm you not only have to comply with Canadian laws but also the laws of the country the firearm will be imported in.  While it is not an overly difficult task for those who know what to do, many opt to have a licensed business take care of the red tape which is an added expense but provides a great deal of protection. 

There is an option to change the legal classification of a 12-6 firearm, but it must be done by a firearms business that is appropriately licensed by the RCMP to make such a conversion. The legal classification can be changed by installing a longer barrel or by deactivating the firearm.  In the following video, we take a couple of short barrel revolvers and install barrels over 105 mm and then take care of the legal paperwork for a client. Watch our YouTube video here.

It is important to note, if you have a licensed business do this work for you, the short barrel that has been removed is now legally considered a prohibited device, virtually the same classification as a suppressor, and unless for some reason you are allowed to be in possession of a prohibited device, which most aren’t, the business has to retain the barrel. 

A firearm is defined by law and there are numerous things that can be done so that the firearm no longer meets that definition. As such, the RCMP has put forth guidelines fordeactivationwhich assist in classification change process but it is important to note that these guidelines are not law and the final classification change tends to be at the discretion of the registrar.  We have seen firearms that do not meet the legal definition to be called a firearm which the registrar still required to be registered, and we have also seen firearms that exceed the deactivation guidelines which the registrar would not deem deactivated. 

Finally, you can turn the firearm over to a properly licensed business or your local police station.  Important note, if you intend to turn your firearm over to the police for destruction, make sure to call them ahead of time and explain your intentions so that they can have an officer who is familiar with the process present.  To avoid drama, you don’t want to show up at a police station unannounced with a firearm in tow.

To summarize, with your 12-6, or 12-6.1, firearm you can:

  • Shoot your firearm at the range
  • Sell it to other 12-6 licensed individuals
  • Export the firearm from Canada to sell
  • Change its classification by altering its barrel length, calibre or deactivating 
  • Turn the firearm into the police
  • Donate to a licensed firearms business

If you have firearms that you wish to dispose of, we encourage you to contact usdirectly as we have assisted firearms owners across Canada legally dispose of unwanted ammunition, firearms and accessories.  In turn, we have used those donations to further firearm safety and education for new and experienced enthusiasts alike.  

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Where to Shoot – Legal Shooting Areas in British Columbia and Canada

Announcement May 22, 2019

At Silvercore, we are often asked what the rules are in regards to where can a person legally discharge a firearm in areas throughout BC and other provinces, so we thought we’d write a blog post on it! 

It is important to note that this blog post is not designed to be an article providing legal advice, but rather a primer to understand how firearms use is regulated in BC and throughout Canada. 

Understanding how firearms use is regulated first steams from an understanding of all three levels of our government and the roles they play in respect to firearms regulations.

The Federal Governmentwill set the majority of your firearms licensing, possession, acquisitions, and classifications. Federal Laws would concern the Firearms Act and its regulations of the Criminal Code.

An example of this would be that all firearms owners need to have a valid firearms licence, also known as your PAL – possession and acquisition license. The Firearms Act also regulates the acquisition, registration, storage, and the carrying of firearms in Canada.

Under the Criminal Code of Canada, a firearm is broadly defined under the Criminal Code of Canada and additional firearms-related offences can also be found there. 

For more information on the Criminal Code of Canada and the Canada Firearms Act and Regulations please see below: 

The Provincial Government, in BC at least, more or less stays out of the regulating of firearms use unless it is in conjunction with lawful hunting activities. These laws relate to game, fish, and wildlife acts but can restrict shooting within certain distances of roads or dwelling for example.  

The B.C. Firearms Act regulates safe firearm use and transportation in the province, while the Wildlife Act governs the use of firearms while hunting.

As this article does not deal with the harvesting of animals, rather the simple discharge of firearms, you can refer to the hunting synopsis here for more information.

Municipal governmentslikely have rules in place which will allow or deny the discharge of firearms, and once you are sure you meet both federal and provincial regulations, municipal bylaws are what you will need to explore next. Municipal governments handle noise, nuisance, zoning, and by-laws.

For example, in Vancouver, the discharge of firearms is prohibited whereas Richmond will allow firearms discharge in certain areas such as gun clubs, and farmland. In comparison, the city of Delta allows firearms discharge provided it is not single projectile (ie. shotguns only).  

Here are some examples of municipal firearms discharge bylaws:

It’s important to always know and follow laws when you choose to go out shooting, especially you’re out in the bush. If you live in the Fraser Valley and like to go shooting or hunting, then you should familiarize yourself with the No Shooting Areas set forth by the Province of BC and the Fraser Valley Regional District.

This blog is a helpful resource to know what areas are no shoot zones. Remember to also refer to the most recent Hunting & Trapping Regulations Synopsis for site and access restrictions, illegal guiding and illegal transporting, what is unlawful, and hunting methods and provincial bag limits, and remember that it’s continuously updated online.A friendly reminder to check online for updates and as of April 5th, 2017, more no shooting areas have been implemented and added to the already existing zones due to reckless gun use.

For more information on legislation, policies, procedures, and for the allocation of fish and wildlife resources for recreational and commercial use you can visit the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Operations, and Natural Resources Fish & Wildlife Branch online here.

The Fraser Valley Special Area Hunting and Firearms Discharge map is a quick and easy way to visually see where firearms use is permitted. You can view it here.

Below you will find a link to the new no shooting areas implemented April 5, 2017, in coordination with the Province of BC and the Fraser Valley Regional District.

NOTICE: The geographic information system, GIS,  support for this was provided by Fraser Valley Regional District. Their GIS Analyst has provided a Google Earth KMZ file showing the new no shooting areas that you may have access to. Anyone using the KMZ file must understand that the regulation as deposited is what is legal (just in case there is a discrepancy in interpretation). The KMZ below ONLY shows the new regulations, it does not include existing regulations.

NOTICE: With the exception of persons engaged in lawful hunting or trapping, the discharge of firearms is prohibited within 400m of the indicated roads. Other shooting restrictions may apply. Please see the Wildlife Act Closed Areas Regulations for more information. Should there be a discrepancy in interpretation, the regulation as deposited is correct.

Also, the expanded no shoot areas for the Fraser Valley in a downloadable google earth KMZ file: No Shooting Areas

Should any further questions arise, please call our office at 604-940-7785 or email info@silvercore.ca or check out our website at https://silvercore.ca

If you need hunting insurance or would like to be kept up to date with current events of interest to you, join the Silvercore Club which has 10 million in North America wide firearms and hunting related liability insurance!

Additional Reading Material: 

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Obtaining your FWID and hunting license

Announcement May 22, 2019


Obtaining a hunting license in British Columbia is not as complicated as it may seem at first. To help you on your way, we’ve created a quick infographic on how you can get your Fish & Wildlife ID and hunting license in no time at all!

Important contact details

The situation depicted in the infographic applies to residents of BC only. Government rules and regulations are always subject to change, if you have any questions or concerns whether the information stated above is still 100% accurate or complete, please contact our office today.  


Not certified yet?

Take a firearms safety course

Take the CORE hunter ed course

If you prefer to study in the comfort of your home and on your own time, Silvercore has created and online training course for the CORE Hunter Eduction course as well as a full online prep course for the Canadian Firearms Safety Course and Restricted Safety course

So it’s your choice! Whether you decide to take both courses or just the one, we are here to help you every step of the way. Should any further questions arise, please call our office at 604-940-7785 or email info@silvercore.ca

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What You Need to Hunt in British Columbia

Announcement May 22, 2019

Want to get into hunting just in time for the 2019 season? Well, you’re in luck as this week we are discussing what you need to hunt, legally, in British Columbia! There are two different ways to hunt in B.C. The first being hunting with your own non-restricted firearm or the second being hunting with a licensed partner who has their PAL.

Option 1- Hunting with your non-restricted firearm

This option is for outdoor enthusiasts who want to hunt with their own non-restricted firearm. We recommend obtaining your Possession and Acquisition Licence, PAL, first. One might think that it would be logical to take the CORE Hunter Education course certificate first, but hear us out.

If you intend to hunt with a personal firearm and do not have a valid PAL, then you will have to take the Canadian Firearms Safety (CFSC/ CRFSC) course. The reason we recommend that students take the Canadian Firearms Safety course first is so they safely, adequately, and legally know how to handle their firearms before heading into the wilderness.

Once you have your PAL, you are now ready to take the CORE Hunter Education course. Since you have already taken the CFSC/ CRFSC not only can you safely handle a firearm you can now be exempted from the practical examination that occurs in the CORE course.

To be exempted from the practical exam, students must provide proof of PAL course completion ie. course reports (these are given to you at the end of your CFSC / CRFSC class provided you’ve passed). If you’re a previous student of Silvercore, we’ll automatically check our records to see if you can be exempted and will mark the class list for the instructor accordingly. Please note that a valid PAL, gun license, is not accepted as proof for an exemption for the practical test as per BCWF regulations.

Once you have completed both the Canadian Firearms Safety course and the CORE Hunter Education course you can then safely and legally hunt in B.C. with your non-restricted firearm.

Option 2- Hunting with a partner who has a valid PAL

If you decide not to take the Canadian Firearms Safety course, there is still a mandatory non-restricted practical exam within the CORE course. What this means is that you are still able to hunt legally in B.C. with a non-restricted firearm without a valid PAL. Confused? Let us explain.

To hunt legally in Canada, all that is required of you is to complete the CORE Hunter Education course and obtain your Fish & Wildlife ID (FWID). Meaning you can hunt with a firearm, without a license, as long as you’re under the direct supervision of a hunting buddy who does have a valid PAL. You are required to stay near someone with a valid PAL so they can monitor your safety and handling of the non-restricted firearm.

Here at Silvercore, we recommend that individuals take both the Canadian Firearms Safety Courseand the CORE Hunter Education course. This recommendation is to ensure all our students are adequately prepared, filled to the brim with knowledge and skills, to take on the great outdoors.

If you prefer to study in the comfort of your home and on your own time, Silvercore has created and online training course for the CORE Hunter Eduction course as well as a full online prep course for the Canadian Firearms Safety Course and Restricted Safety course

So it’s your choice! Whether you decide to take both courses or just the one, we are here to help you every step of the way. Should any further questions arise, please call our office at 604-940-7785 or email info@silvercore.ca

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Common practices when buying and selling a firearm

Announcement June 1, 2018

We often have people ask if there are any guidelines that they should follow when they are buying or selling a firearm. Today we are going to go through what those common practices might look like and steps you can take to protect yourself when buying or selling firearms privately.

Tips for the Buyer:

1. Really look at the pictures. What does the advertisement look like? Does it look like someone took a picture of the firearm or does it look like it’s they may have taken it off of a business’s website or off of the internet? Ask for specific shots of the firearm to verify it is legitimate and in their possession.

2. Does the price seem too good to be true for the firearm being sold? If so, it probably is, err on the side of caution.

If you decide that the advertisement is valid and the person you are corresponding with is local and you wish to meet up to complete the exchange, do so in a public area, don’t provide them with your address. Depending on where you live there may be a designated swap spot at your local police detachment that is specifically for online exchanges, call first to verify.

Trust your instincts when setting up a meeting, if you have any safety concerns don’t be afraid to cancel.

Tips for the Seller:

1.  Never accept payment in the form of a cheque or a money order, these can be canceled or bounce. Instead, stick to cash, credit card, or e-transfer payments then you can confirm receipt of payment before handing over the item.

For both parties:

1. Ensure that the person you are dealing with has a valid Possession and Acquisition Licence (PAL) for the type of firearm which they are looking to obtain or sell, you can do this by calling into the Canadian Firearms Program’s (CFP) toll-free number 1-800-731-4000.

2. If you are buying or selling on Firearms Canada or any other online websites, check user ratings to see that the person you are corresponding with has a solid background and that you can trust them. Talk to people that they have had previous dealings with to reduce your risk.

3. Be cautious of vague initial inquiries that may be general and not specific to your firearm or watch for poor grammar or spelling, this could raise red flags that it may be a scam.

When a transaction is for a Non-Restricted firearm to another individual, besides verifying their PAL, nothing further is required. However, if it is a Restricted or Prohibited firearm, you must call into the CFP to initiate the transfer sequence. This can be done by calling their toll-free number. When doing so you will need the following information to initiate this transfer:

  1. Full Legal name of the person that the firearm is being transferred to,
  2. PAL number, and
  3. Address,
  4. Purpose of acquiring firearm set out in section 28 of the Firearms Act which includes, but is not limited to
    1. target practice,
    2. target shooting competitions,
    3. or as a collector

In order to legally purchase, possess, or transport a Restricted firearm you must either have a Long Term Authorization to Transport or have that condition attached to your PAL. To obtain this you need to be a member of a CFP approved gun club or gun range and send proof of your membership into the Chief Firearms Officer (CFO) of your Province who will review the transfer to ensure that the transferee is acquiring the firearm for one of the permitted purposes mentioned above. The Silvercore Shooting club is a federal club that also includes 10 million in liability insurance throughout North America which satisfies this requirement (Silvercore Shooting Club).

Once the transfer has been completed, both parties will receive a confirmation notice by mail to advise that the transfer has been completed and the new registration certificate will be mailed to the new owner within the following weeks.

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RSS Feed Tutorial

Training April 26, 2018

Have you noticed the little symbols which can be found on the top of each category of the Firearms Canada website? This is called an RSS Feed and by clicking on it you can subscribe to a category that interests you most and receive an alert for any new content specific to that feed.

What is an RSS Feed?
RSS feed stands for Really Simple Syndication or Rich Site Summary, which is essentially simple text files that when submitted to feed directories, will allow subscribers to see new content once it’s been added.

This means that you won’t have to search through feeds on Firearms Canada and try to determine what is new and what is old, you will automatically get updates for new items posted, so long as you have subscribed to that RSS feed.

What do I need to subscribe to an RSS feed?
To subscribe to an RSS feed you will need something called a feed reader which can group your content based on its category to be read and viewed effortlessly.

A feed reader or feed aggregator is a way to view all your feeds at one time via one interface. There are many different types of feed readers, some are web-based which means you view content from your internet browser using a specific feed reader. Some internet browsers will also have built-in feed readers, while others come in the form of an application on your computer desktop. There are also feed readers available for those of you that like to use your mobile device to view things and also email based feed readers that you can adjust the frequency of notifications for.

 

Follow the steps below to set up your RSS Feed on Firearms Canada. You can click the pictures below to enlarge them.

Step 1: Login to your Firearms Canada Account and go to the main page of the website.

Step 2: Click on a category of interest to you that you want RSS feed updates for.
Categories on Firearms Canada include:

  1. Air  Rifles/ Pistols and Paintball,
  2. Ammo and Reloading,
  3. Antique / Memorabilia,
  4. Bows / Crossbows,
  5. Firearms- Non-Restricted,
  6. Firearms – Prohibited,
  7. Firearms – Restricted,
  8. Gear and Equipment,
  9. Knives, Swords, Bayonets,
  10. Optics, and
  11. Parts / Accessories and Cleaning Supplies


Step 3: Click on the RSS Feed symbol in the desired category on Firearms Canada. When you do this, coding will be generated in your web browser, you won’t need to do anything with this.

Step 4A:  If you do not have a feed reader, then you will need to select the URL that shows up in your web browser for the feed you selected on and copy it.

Step 4B:  If you do have a feed reader, you may have a box pop up like the one illustrated in the picture below to subscribe to that feed without using the URL link.

Step 5A: If you do not have a feed reader, you will need to get one. This can be done by doing a simple Google Search for “Feed Readers”  and once you have selected a feed reader that best suits your wants and needs you will need to paste the URL you copied from the feed and put it into your feed reader (as outlined in Step 4A). This will subscribe you to that feed.

Step 5B: If you have a feed reader, and you have clicked Subscribe (as outlined in Step 4B) you can then click on the symbol for RSS Feeds to view updates. The feed reader illustrated in the picture below is of a built-in browser feed reader which is an extension for Google Chrome.

Step 6: When viewing ads through the feed reader, if you find one of interest you would like to contact the seller about or want additional information on, you can click on the link for the ad which will re-direct you to the ad listing on the website.

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SMS Notifications Tutorial

Training March 14, 2018

As a seller on Firearms Canada you can add a mobile number to your account. When another member tries to contact you using the inquiry form you will receive an instant SMS Notification. You won’t have to miss out on a deal with another member again. This feature is optional, so if you want to continue receiving only emails you can leave the phone number field blank.

To activate this feature on your account follow the steps below to set up your mobile number to have SMS notifications.

Step 1: When on the homepage of Firearms Canada, click on “My Dashboard” which can be found at the top right corner.

Step 2: You will then scroll down to Dashboard options and click on the “Edit Profile” option.

Step 3: This will take you to all your Profile Details. Scroll down to almost the very bottom of the page and you will find the “Mobile Number” field. You will then want to type in the number you wish to receive SMS messages on.

Step 4: Receive SMS Notifications to your mobile device.

Standard SMS rates may apply. Please note that you may opt out of SMS Notifications through your profile settings on Firearms Canada at any time by following the first 2 Steps above and then removing the phone number instead of adding it as mentioned in Step 3.

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Featured Ad’s

Training January 22, 2018

Are you looking for a quick sale or do you need your ad to stand out? Featuring your Ad is a great way to do that!

By using the “Featured Ad” attribute your ad will have a ribbon across the top left corner and a highlighted red background which is just another way to make your posting stand out from other regular ads. It will also show up in the Featured Listings at the top of the front page of the website. This way your ad will still be on the first page even if its not a newer ad anymore. Continue reading …

2036 total views, 1 today

Bump Up Your Ad

Training December 22, 2017

We’ve implemented a lot of features in the last 6 months and we’d like to make sure that our members are able to take advantage of them, so we’re including How-To’s in our Blog!

“Bump your Ad”  is exactly as it sounds, you can bump your ad to the top of the ad listings when searching query results. This increases the chance of your ad being viewed more and sets active posters apart from other sellers. Please note that when looking to use this feature, you will have to wait 72 hours after the initial posting of a new ad before you can bump it to the top, if it hasn’t reached that time period yet you won’t see the option to bump your ad. Please be aware there is a nominal fee of $0.99 for bumping your ad. Continue reading …

1949 total views, 4 today

Improved User Rating System

Announcement December 7, 2017

You asked, we listened.  Firearms Canada has greatly improved it’s user rating system, and the best part is that we were able to retain all of your old reviews in the process!

Continue reading …

2489 total views, 1 today

Easy Ways to Promote Your Firearms on Firearms Canada

Announcement August 17, 2017

Easy Ways to Promote Your Firearms on Firearms Canada!

1. Choose Your Words Wisely

When listing your item on Firearms Canada, choose your wording carefully and use the right keywords. Keep your title concise, but use as many descriptive words as you effectively can, so that your item will appear in more searches. The more descriptive you are, the fewer questions you’ll have to deal with from possible buyers. To find the right keywords, consider all of the terms you might use to describe the item, and then fit the words together. For example, instead of “Remington 870,” use “Remington 870 Express Synthetic Pump Action Shotgun.” Do a search in Firearms Canada to look for examples of similar listings with a lot of activity.

2. Be Honest

Always tell the truth on the items that you are trying to sell, you’ll gain a better reputation on Firearms Canada. Improving your reputation will boost sales. Reputation is very important in the Firearms Canada community. People are often tempted to complain, and it’s very easy to get negative comments that can hurt you long term. So if there’s a scratch or dent on an item, be upfront about it. While you might make a few sales at lower prices, hiding imperfections will cost you even more in the long run. Some buyers are even looking for some used or refurbished items that they can fix up, but no one likes being surprised by an item in poor condition.

3. Create a Professional Listing

With any business, the more professional you look, the more people will trust you. Make sure you have good pictures of your item and a clear, well-written description. A bulleted list in your description will be very attractive for potential buyers. You’ll catch more attention with short, informative lines that don’t waste time or take up a lot of space.

4. Take Good Pictures

Don’t go crazy with pictures; quality is far more important than quantity. Photos are a great tool for sales, but you don’t need more than three per item.

Posting pictures that have visual appeal will attract potential buyers. Make sure that your pictures represent the item well by taking pictures from all sides and angles. Use an appropriate amount of lighting, and use a neutral background. Remember, no one wants to see your item in the context of your messy house. Do not post any blurry pictures. If your item does have an imperfection, take a picture of it.

5. Set the Right Price

Set the best price for your item. Do some research on the type of firearm or accessory you are trying to sell and set the price accordingly.

6. Website Activity  

In maintaining your activity on Firearms Canada you are engaging in advertising for your business at a low cost as the website itself is advertised on a regular basis through various sources such as firearm magazines/news papers and monthly gun shows and much more. 

7. Be Clear about Your Policies

To avoid any confusion and to maintain your reputation, make sure your listing is clear about any policies that you may have, on returns and shipping for example. You don’t want to waste time dealing with an upset customer because you weren’t open about your policies upfront. That’s time you could be spending on selling another item.

If practicable, use a seven-day return policy that requires customers to pay for half of the shipping costs. Customers are more likely to take a chance on your item if they know that they can return it, but if they have to pay for part of the return shipping, they’re less likely to take advantage of you.

8. Ship Smartly, and Don’t Inflate the Cost

If buyers see an unreasonable shipping cost, they won’t even give your item a chance. In fact, if the actual shipping cost is low, take the loss and don’t charge them for it. Free shipping is very attractive to potential buyers.

9. Practice Good Customer Service

In the Firearms Canada community, providing good customer service goes a long way. Maintaining good relationships within the site will build a good reputation for yourself as a seller and for the site which will drive more potential buyers.

Respond to your buyers’ questions in a timely manner. Even if you don’t have the answer right away let them know you have received the enquiry and that you will get back to them. Promptly send your invoices, and let your buyers know when their item is on the way.

Be kind and courteous, just like you’d expect to be treated. Work with your buyers if there are some special circumstances that are within reason.

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Special Bulletin for Businesses No. 72

Announcement July 14, 2017

Background

The maximum capacity of a cartridge magazine is set out in Part 4 of the Regulations Prescribing Certain Firearms and other Weapons, Components and Parts of Weapons, Accessories, Cartridge Magazines, Ammunition and Projectiles as Prohibited or Restricted.  The Regulations prescribe “prohibited devices”, and a magazine that has a capacity which exceeds the maximum permitted capacity is a prohibited device. Businesses can be in possession of prohibited devices if appropriately licensed.  However, individuals may not possess prohibited devices.

Continue reading …

2474 total views, 1 today

Bill C-42, the Common Sense Firearms Licensing Act

Announcement July 14, 2017

 

Full Text 

On June 18, 2015, Canada’s Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, the Honourable Steven Blaney, highlighted the Royal Assent of the Common Sense Firearms Licensing Act.This legislation amends the Firearms Act and the Criminal Code.

The news release published by Public Safety Canada provided the following information:

Effective immediately, these changes to the Firearms Act and the Criminal Codedo the following:

  • Make classroom participation in firearms safety courses mandatory for first-time licence applicants;
  • Provide for the discretionary authority of Chief Firearms Officers (CFOs) to be subject to the regulations;
  • Strengthen the Criminal Code provisions relating to orders prohibiting the possession of firearms where a person is convicted of an offence involving domestic violence; and
  • Provide the Governor in Council with the authority to prescribe firearms to be non-restricted or restricted (such prescribing would be informed by independent expert advice).

Within the next several months, upon a date fixed by an order in council, the following changes will come into effect:

  • Creation of a six-month grace period at the end of the five-year licence period to stop people from immediately becoming criminalized for paperwork delays around license renewals;
  • Elimination of the Possession Only Licence (POL) and conversion of all existing POLs to Possession and Acquisition Licences (PALs);
  • Authorizations to Transport become a condition of a licence for certain routine and lawful activities such as target shooting; taking a firearm home after a transfer; going to a gunsmith, gun show, a Canadian port of exit; or a peace officer or a Chief Firearms Officer (CFO) for verification, registration or disposal; and
  • Sharing of firearms import information when restricted and prohibited firearms are imported into Canada by businesses.

Ce bulletin est aussi disponible en français

 

Legislative Summary of Bill C-42: An Act to amend the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts * Full Text

Keep Up With Useful and Fun Firearms Training On Social Media  

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CRITIQUE OF CANADA FIREARMS PROGRAM 2014 FIESD ANNUAL REPORT

Announcement July 11, 2017

 

By Gary A. Mauser and Dennis R.Young – June 22, 2017

To start from the beginning, we were both shocked when we saw claims like this one appear in newspapers published across the country:

Continue reading …

2073 total views, 3 today

List of Restricted and Prohibited Firearms

Policy, Regulation and Law June 29, 2017

List of Restricted and Prohibited Firearms – Updated 2017-03-06

Regulations Prescribing Certain Firearms and Other Weapons, Components and Parts of Weapons, Accessories, Cartridge Magazines, Ammunition and Projectiles as Prohibited, Restricted or Non-RestrictedList of Restricted and Prohibited Firearms – Date modified: 2017-03-06

Continue reading …

5360 total views, 5 today

Magazine Attached to or Inserted Into the Firearm

Policy, Regulation and Law June 29, 2017

Cartridge Magazine Attached to or Inserted Into the Firearm

A lot of people have been looking for the regulations surrounding loaded vs unloaded firearms.  Below is the percent section of the regulation as well as links to the original documents. 

Storage, Display, Transportation and Handling of Firearms by Individuals Regulations

Continue reading …

1989 total views, 2 today

Thank you Wolfstrack!

Announcement May 22, 2017

While this site has many supportive members and admin, I would like to take a moment to publicly acknowledge one who has gone above and beyond the call of duty to help ensure the sites security and access to all.

Firearms Canada’s admin and members would like to publicly thank Wolfstrack for his tireless efforts as lead moderator of this site!

1544 total views, 1 today

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  • Obtaining your FWID and hunting license

    by on May 22, 2019 - 0 Comments

    Obtaining a hunting license in British Columbia is not as complicated as it may seem at first. To help you on your way, we’ve created a quick infographic on how you can get your Fish & Wildlife ID and hunting license in no time at all! Important contact details Silvercore Training (CFSC and CORE) BC Wildlife […]

  • What to do with your 12-6 Prohibited Firearms

    by on May 22, 2019 - 0 Comments

    There are three general classifications of firearms in Canada, non-restricted, restricted and prohibited.   Non – Restricted – Generally rifles and shotguns Restricted – Generally handguns Prohibited – Guns that are deemed to be not allowedfor several reasons including function and design (i.e. full auto, short barrel, etc.) According to theCriminal Code,a prohibited firearm is: a handgun that: has a […]

  • What You Need to Hunt in British Columbia

    by on May 22, 2019 - 0 Comments

    Want to get into hunting just in time for the 2019 season? Well, you’re in luck as this week we are discussing what you need to hunt, legally, in British Columbia! There are two different ways to hunt in B.C. The first being hunting with your own non-restricted firearm or the second being hunting with a […]

  • Where to Shoot - Legal Shooting Areas in British Columbia and Canada

    by on May 22, 2019 - 0 Comments

    At Silvercore, we are often asked what the rules are in regards to where can a person legally discharge a firearm in areas throughout BC and other provinces, so we thought we’d write a blog post on it!  It is important to note that this blog post is not designed to be an article providing […]

  • Pro Tips to pass your CFSC/CRFSC Canadian Firearms Safety Course

    by on May 22, 2019 - 0 Comments

    Over the past 25 years, to date, of not only teaching the Canadian Firearms Safety Course and Restricted Firearms Safety Course but also training and certifying the majority of current instructors in our area, we have arrived at some simple truths that will assist anyone looking to pass their course with high marks. Firearms are […]

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