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How to choose a rifle scope

Announcement January 13, 2021

Hunting season will be here in no time and with that, many new hunters are preparing for their first hunt. But a big question is; what rifle scope should I purchase?

I just purchased my first rifle about a month ago now and before doing anything else with it, I wanted to get a scope for it. As I started looking online at available scopes I quickly realized that I had no idea where to begin and what anything really meant. So, I did some researching and talked to colleagues, read articles and listened to some Silvercore Podcast’s since we had an optic specialist on talking about Vortex Optics.

But doing all that, it took me a while to really figure out what it was that I was looking for. I’m the type of person who needs to know every detail when it comes to buying something, so in order for me to make a properly educated decision I felt it was really important that I understood all the components to an optic, what the different numbers meant, and how they worked.

Being passionate about the industry I’m in, I wanted to take the time to share this new knowledge I’ve gained in my journey of learning about optics. So let’s get right into it by reviewing the different components that I’m going to go over with you today.

  1. Magnification numbers
  2. Objective Lens
  3. Fixed Power Vs. Variable Power
  4. Reticle / Crosshair
  5. Bullet drop compensation
  6. Light transmission
  7. Eye Relief
  8. Parallax
  9. Field of View
  10. Adjustments
  11. Lenses
  12. Coatings

Magnification numbers

If you’ve checked out any of the rifle scopes either online or in a store yet then you’ll have noticed that they all start with numbers that look something like this 3-9×40 or some other numbers with the same format ie. #-# x #.

The number range of 3-9 is your magnification ability. So for example, in a scope which has a magnification range of 3-9, this means you are able to magnify and enlarge your target starting at 3 times it’s size, up to 9 times it’s size. 3 being your low power and 9, your high power.

There are many different ranges you can find when it comes to rifle scope magnification, but bigger isn’t always better.

Rather than purchasing a rifle scope based on a larger magnification range and thinking that if you get something with a larger magnification ability, the better off you’ll be, decide first what you plan to do with your rifle. There’s no point in spending extra money on a feature if you’re not going to use it. But thinking long term is also a good thing. Personally, I decided on a scope with a 3-15 magnification power because I plan to go hunting, but I can also see myself getting into precision rifle shooting in the future and if I’m spending a good chunk of change on a high quality optic, if possible, I’d like it to be a multi-purpose use optic.

Objective Lens

The objective lens is the lens found at the end of your scope (the one you look into is called your ocular lens). The 40 from 3-9×40, refers to the diameter of the objective lens and is in millimetres. The larger this number, the larger the lens itself is.

When choosing the size of your objective lens an important consideration will be when you plan to use the scope. Will there be low light or will it be used only during the middle of the day when there is plenty of light? The larger the objective lens, the more light can be transmitted which can help to make a clearer image in lower lighting situations.

The larger you go with your objective lens however, the heavier it will be and if you are going hunting and trying to pack light, this may not be the most practical.  You’ll also find yourself needing higher mounting scope rings which could potentially be harder to find and it can also affect your cheek and weld method causing you to either need an adjustable cheek rest, or a stock specialized for your firearm to allow for more comfortable shooting.

If you don’t plan to be shooting during dawn or dusk when light conditions aren’t as ideal, then you can get away with a smaller objective lens. Majority of scopes out there are between 32 and 44 mm.

Fixed Power vs Variable Power

We’ve already discussed the magnification numbers, but we only discussed the variable power. There is also something called fixed power, this means that there is no range of magnification on that particular scope.

An example of this would be 4×32. This means that the scope has the 4 power magnification or having the target appear 4 times its typical size. There is no adjustment option for this.

As with anything, there will pro’s and con’s with one option vs another. One of the pro’s of a fixed power scope is that there is less fiddling around with magnification as it’s already done for you. This provides a level of assurance in not having to worry about making a mistake in your magnification adjustments and then missing your target.  It’s also going to cost less which is great if you have a fixed budget.

Possible con’s are that because the magnification is fixed, you aren’t able to adjust it to a target further away or that may be closer. For this reason variable scopes can be more desirable.

Another pro to a variable scope is that it can ultimately be used anywhere because of the ability to adjust your magnification.

Reticle / Crosshair

The reticle or crosshair is the point in which the vertical and horizontal lines meet up to make a cross or “+”. This is the aiming point. There are many variations of reticles including, but not limited to fine crosshair, duplex crosshair, german reticle, target dot, and mill-dot.

A consideration is the reticle’s focal plane. The reticle will either be located at the front focal plane, also known as the First Focal Plane or FFP. Or it can be located at the rear focal plane, also known as the Second Focal Plane, or SFP. The difference is that with the SFP, the reticle will remain a constant size whether the target grows larger due to increased magnification, or shrinks due to decreased magnification. If you purchase a FFP, the reticle will increase with magnification, or decrease with lower magnification.

Second Focal Plane scopes are not as expensive as those that are First Focal Plane, but depending on what type of shooting you plan to do, it may be worth wile purchasing one on the FFP. Wether you buy a scope that is FFP or SFP will depend on your personal preference, and again, what you plan to do with your rifle.  Because I’m looking at getting into longer range precision shooting and I like that the reticle size increases with magnification, I felt the FFP would be a good choice for me. But purchasing a FFP scope may not be the best option for you if all you plan to do is go shooting at a max of 100 yards.

Bullet Drop Compensation

Some rifle scopes have a bullet drop compensation (BDC) feature, this can also be referred to as ballistic elevation. This is actually something that’s built in to your reticle and it compensates for the effect of gravity. In order for this to be accurate, it needs to be specifically tuned for the particular ballistic trajectory of a particular combination of gun and cartridge at a predefined muzzle velocity and air density.

Nikon has created the SpotOn technology which allows you to go to their website, input the type of scope you have, followed by the bullet size, manufacturer, grain amount, bullet style, weight, and how far you’re shooting, scope magnification and it will show you where to have everything lined up on your reticle. It’s pretty cool, but keep in mind that this doesn’t account for windage.

Light Transmission

This is the rifle scope’s ability to transmit available light and give a bright and sharp image. Factors that can affect brightness include objective lens diameter, magnification, type and quality of the objective lens glass and the type of lens coatings.

Eye Relief

Eye relief is the space between the ocular lens and where your eye is placed. This is important in order for you to prevent ‘scope eye’. This occurs when you don’t have proper eye relief and your scope hits the area around your eye from the firearms recoil after a shot and can be pretty painful. Eye relief also plays a role in preventing eye strain and ensuring a clear view.

The amount of eye relief you need is dependant on the firearm you have as well as the magnification of your scope. The more powerful a firearm, the more recoil, then the more eye relief distance you’ll need. That said, the higher the magnification of your scope, the less eye relief you will need.

Typically 4 inches is the average eye relief distance needed.

Parallax

Parallax occurs when your reticle and the target don’t line up within the scope and can create an unclear sight picture. You can spot this by moving your eye or head around whilst peering into the scope; if the reticle moves around the target you’re aiming at, then you are able to confirm that it is a parallax issue you’re dealing with. More on this and how to fix it below in the section on adjustments.

         

Field of View

Field of view (FOV) simply put is the area which you can view through your optic. As you increase magnification, the field of view decreases. FOV is mеаѕurеd in feet at 100 yards. To explain, if a rifle scope states that the field of view is 42ft at 100 yards, that means you can view a 42 foot scene from left to right at 100 yards. For scopes that have a variable magnification power you’ll likely find a range for the FOV, for example, 41.2-8.6 ft/100 yds. This accounts for the magnification variation which if it were 5-15 then at 5 power you’ll see a scene of 41.2 across and at 15 power you’ll see a scene of 8.6ft across.  

Adjustments

There are many adjustments which can be found on a scope. These include the following:

  1. Windage
  2. Elevation
  3. Parallax
  4. Illumination
  5. Magnification
  6. Diopter
Windage and Elevation

Windage is the horizontal adjustment on your scope whereas Elevation is the adjustment of the vertical direction.

Parallax

These adjustments are made when parallax is an issue. This is done in steps; obtain your sight picture by aiming at your target, then adjust your parallax until the reticle becomes clearer. You want it as clear and crisp as possible. Then, while lifting your cheek off the stock of your firearm, continue to look through your scope lens. Look around and see if the crosshairs move off target when you do. If they do, continue to adjust until they stay focused and centred on your target, even when you move your eye around. Once there, lock these into place.

Illumination

Illumination adjustments can be useful in controlling the level of brightness, especially when in low light conditions as it increases the illumination intensity for the lit parts of the reticle/crosshairs.

Magnification

This adjustment is exactly like it sounds, allowing you to adjust your level of magnification (provided you have a variable power and not fixed) with the given range of magnification power on the rifle scope you have.

Diopter

The Diopter adjusts focus of the reticle, this is not to be used to focus on an object.  While it will focus on the object, you don’t want to because it will effect the focus of the reticle, which is on another plane.

Stare at a blank blue sky or single colour wall, bring the scope up and quickly look through.  Don’t stare, your first glance is what you are looking for, then take the scope away, adjust the diopter.  Repeat. Until the reticle is crystal clear.  Your eye very quickly adjust focus so you want the reticle clear at a relaxed eye focus at a neutral object so your eye has only one thing to try and view. Then you use your parallax adjustment to reduce parallax which, typically brings your target into focus.

Lenses

Typically, you’ll find about eight lenses on a rifle scope (this includes the obvious ocular lens and the objective lens), however there can be more, or less.

Coatings

Majority of scopes will have some sort of coating on the lens and near all rifle scopes are fogproof and waterproof. The coatings available will vary and typically, the more coatings you have, the more expensive the rifle scope will be. Coatings can provide a clearer and brighter sight picture as well as reduce glare, but having multiple coatings doesn’t necessarily mean that it will be better than one with a single coating; this will depend on not only the coatings but also the glass quality.

There are 4 types of coatings commonly found on rifle scopes, these include the following:

  1. Coated – This means there is a single layer coating on at least one of the lens surfaces.
  2. Fully Coated – This means that there is a single layer of coatings on all air to glass surfaces.
  3. Multicoated – This means that there is more than one layer of coatings on at least one lens surface.
  4. Fully Multicoated – This means there are multiple layers of coatings on all air to glass surfaces.

Conclusion

This information should give you a good basis of understanding to be able to determine what type of rifle scope you’ll be looking to purchase. However, if you are looking for additional information, I’d definitely recommend listening to The Silvercore Podcast, more specifically, these episodes:

In addition to The Silvercore Podcast, we also have our YouTube channel where we’ve shared videos on how to mount a rifle scope as well as sighting in a rifle the easy way which will come into use after you’ve purchased your rifle scope.

Happy scope shopping!

Corrine Owerko

55 total views, 1 today

Emergency Preparedness and Becoming a Prepper

Announcement January 13, 2021

In this episode of The Silvercore Podcast, Travis Bader speaks with Ian Jones from The Canadian Prepper Podcast and discusses how he got into prepping and what he would recommend to others to have in order to be prepared for any eventualities.

If you have a story that would be of value to the Silvercore audience, or know someone who does, email us at podcast@silvercore.ca.  We would love to hear from you!

If you know someone who would enjoy our podcast or YouTube videos, or anything else that Silvercore offers please share it with them.  Please engage us with your comments, questions and suggestions likes, shares and subscriptions.  If you have a story to tell that our audience would appreciate, or know someone who does, let us know.  Your interaction will help us in providing the best possible future content.
You can listen to episode 24 of our podcast on Podbean, Apple iTunes, YouTube, Spotify, SoundCloud, Google Podcast, and Google Play. All you’ll have to do is search for ‘The Silvercore Podcast.’ 

If you have any feedback or questions that we can address, please reach out to us via social media or at 1-855-771-5837 or info@silvercore.ca. Finally, don’t forget to rate, review, and subscribe to the podcast, and while you’re at it, follow us on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter!

Travis Bader

Join the Silvercore Club!

Looking for Show Notes of this Podcast? Read them Here!

58 total views, 1 today

How to get a gun in Canada

Announcement January 13, 2021

So you want to get a gun and go shooting at the range, or maybe you want to go hunting, or get into competition shooting. It can be tricky to navigate what is legally required of you to get a gun in Canada.

First thing’s first, you need a firearms licence. There are many terms people use for this, but the proper name is a Possession and Acquisition Licence, or PAL. (previously known as a POL or FAC, more on these terms here).

In order to obtain your licence to buy a gun, you need proper training. In Canada, the RCMP and Canadian Firearms Program (CFP) require individuals to take a firearms training course called the Canadian Firearms Safety Course (CFSC).

This course will teach you the different types of firearms, firearm actions, how to use the firearm, how to identify the proper ammunition that can be used with that particular firearm, what ammunition types are available and what uses they are commonly for. You will learn the laws and regulations around firearms, your firearms licence, what is required of you as a responsible and legal firearms owner, and what conditions you must follow when purchasing, possessing, transporting, storing, or displaying your firearms. You also get the chance to practice with deactivated firearms, giving you the opportunity to see the firearm actions in use and be able to load, and unload them in a safe manner.

Depending on the firearm you wish to purchase, you may just want the CFSC, or you may wish to also take the Canadian Restricted Firearms Safety Course (CRFSC) as well if you want to buy a handgun (the CFSC is for long guns like rifles and shotguns).

At the end of your training, you are required to complete a written examination which includes true and false and multiple choice questions. You will be required to obtain 80% or higher to pass that written component and move on to the next phase of your examinaton. Pending a successful written exam, you will then show your instructor how to identify the firearms, ammunition,  load and unload the firearm, all while doing so in a safe manner. This is the practical examination and it also requires that you pass with a minimum of 80%.

So you’ve gotten your firearms training, passed examinations, whats next? Well, you will be required to apply with the RCMP for your PAL with your personal information and include proof of your training (these are provided in form of course reports). In addition, you’ll be required to supply information about your current or past conjugal partner (if any) for the past 2 years, 2 references, a photo together with a photo guarantor and your application fees.

Once your PAL application has been submitted, this process can take between 3-6 months prior to being approved. If approved, then you’ll receive your firearms licence in the mail and you can now go out and legally buy a gun.

So, to recap, these are the 5 simple steps required to purchase a firearm.

  1. Take the CFSC training
  2. Pass examinations (pro-tips on how to do this can be found here)
  3. Apply for your PAL
  4. Get your PAL in the mail
  5. Go buy a gun

77 total views, 1 today

How to stay safe in Bear Country

Announcement January 13, 2021

Whether you’re planning your next camping trip, going for a hike up a local mountain or going hunting, you want to be prepared for the unexpected. As Benjamin Franklin once said “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”

One of the first, and best things you can possibly do to protect yourself from a bear encounter is avoidance. There are two types of avoidance:

  1. Initial planning, and
  2.  Site specific

What do we mean by these? Well, your initial planning should consist of creating a bear map to identify that are considered to be high use areas of bears. Then, avoid these areas as much as possible. If you are able, it’s recommended that you perform a helicopter fly over beforehand and work in pairs.

When being site specific, you’ll want to be able to recognize the bear sign and understand the bear behaviour(s), then you can employ your techniques to make sure that your presence is known.

If you see a bear and its unaware of you, this is your best opportunity to still avoid the encounter by quietly leaving. Don’t yell at a bear if it hasn’t given an aggressive signal. This is really important as it could trigger an attack.

In the event of an encounter, do your very best to avoid anything close range and that could be a surprise to the bear. Many people employ the use of bells to alert bears of their presence. Although this is a good idea, these are ineffective when there is high wind or river sounds because they could mask the sound of the bells. Try giving more than one indicator that you are in the area as many animals will wait for a second sensory input prior to feeling.

If you’re planning to be in an area that has the chance of bears being around, we highly recommend taking the time to learn more about bears and their behaviour and signs.

Silvercore’s Online Bear Defence course was created in partnership with James Gary Shelton, the bestselling author on bear behaviour. Many students choose to take this online course to complement their training in conjunction with Silvercore’s Bear Defence Shotgun Course. This in depth online training will lead you through the psychology of a bear and their signs and identification thereof.

You’ll have the opportunity to learn more about encounters and avoidance strategies as well as survival tactics if in the event of an unlucky bear attack. We also lead you through the various bear protection devices including bear spray, firearms and the use of dogs.

Looking for a glimpse of what this course is like? Try our free demo.

Need to be prepared? Get started with the full course!

59 total views, 1 today

What is a Range Safety Officer (RSO) and how do I become one?

Announcement January 12, 2021

Have you ever heard the term RSO, or Range Safety Officer? It’s exactly like it sounds, someone who is in charge or overseeing the safety of individuals at a Range (or Shooting Club), also known as range users.

In addition to overseeing safe shooting procedures, an RSO will also need to know how to deal with malfunctions,  emergency situations as well as organize the procedures when dealing with an emergency. They may also organize range activities and enforce range rules during these events.

It is important that they also know and understand the legal aspects and what is required of them as it pertains to record keeping and reporting.

So what do you need to become a fully trained and certified Range Safety Officer?

Well, first a valid firearms licence, also known as a PAL is required. If you don’t already have this, the Canadian Firearms Safety Course is required to obtain this licence.

Having the knowledge to be a safe range user and know the concepts behind how ranges work will also be required as well as extensive firearms experience. Being physically and mentally fit, being able to pass a criminal record check and vulnerable sector check will also be required. Lastly, valid first aid training which is suitable for the position of a range officer.

After you have your PAL, the knowledge to be a responsible and safe range user, you’ll also need to understand the duties and responsibilities of a Range Safety Officer. Thereafter you will undergo a practical test to demonstrate your ability to manage a firing line. This is done under the supervision of your ranges Chief Range Officer (CRO).

If you are looking to be certified as a RSO at your local range, we recommend taking the Silvercore Online Range User course followed by our Online Range Safety Officer course. These courses provide you with the theoretical knowledge needed to be successful in your practical examination with your local range’s CRO.

 

63 total views, 1 today

What do you need to go fishing?

Announcement January 12, 2021

So you want to go fishing? With modern technology and the internet, sometimes finding the information you need that can be considered reliable and trustworthy can be difficult. This is why Silvercore is here to guide you through what you need to go fishing.

First, decide what type of fishing you want to do. By that we mean, would you like to fish for freshwater fish, also known as non-tidal, or would you like to fish for saltwater fish, also known as tidal. The regulations for these types of fishing are different. Non-tidal fishing is provincially regulated, whereas Tidal fishing is federally regulated.

Freshwater Fishing (Non-Tidal)

In British Columbia, if you plan to go for freshwater fish, you will need a Basic Licence, also known as a Non-Tidal Angling Licence. This is for every angler who is 16 years of age or older and will allow them to fish in the non-tidal waters of beautiful BC.

In addition to your Basic Licence, you may also need a Conservation Surcharge Stamp, a White Sturgeon Conservation Licence, and / or a Classified Waters Licence.

Why? Glad you asked. There are two reasons why these are required. If you plan to fish for a specific type of fish such as Steelhead, non-tidal Salmon, or Sturgeon, or you’re going to specific locations that are regulated as Class I or Class II Classified Waters.

Purchasing these licences can be done either online through the BC Recreational Freshwater Fishing website, or from any vendor who offers this service.

Saltwater Fishing (Tidal)

If you plan to go fishing in the saltwaters of BC , you’ll need a Tidal Waters Fishing Licence. Although free for juveniles (under 16 years old), you’ll still need a licence for them which can be done online under your account.

This licence also has the option to purchase a Salmon Conservation Stamp. In the event that you catch Salmon in saltwater, and you intend to retain it, then you must purchase this stamp. This is not required if you catch and release. The fees for the Salmon Conservation Stamp help generate funds which are provided to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans to the Pacific Salmon Foundation. This helps to support Salmon restoration, stewardship and enhancement projects in British Columbia.

These licences can be purchased through the Department of Fisheries and Oceans of Canada website or through an Independent Access Provider.

Conclusion

When you plan to go fishing, be sure to always check for new regulations as things change from time to time.

If you’d like to know more about Freshwater Fishing such as the species, regulations and limits, equipment and setup and use thereof and more, we would recommend signing up for our online Pacific Northwest Fishing course.

This course was designed with the beginner in mind and is a must for anyone looking to get into the sport of freshwater fishing.   This is a veritable A to Z of everything a new angler needs to know and includes information on how to safely and legally fish in beautiful British Columbia.

To provide you with the best, Silvercore’s course was created in partnership with the world renowned angler, guide and conservationist April Vokey.

Try Our Free Demo

78 total views, 1 today

Silvercore Podcast Ep. 23: Blood Tracking and Science Dogs

Announcement January 12, 2021

In this episode of The Silvercore Podcast, Travis Bader speaks with Lindsay Ware of Science Dogs of New England situated in Maine, USA and discusses how she got into tracking animals for hunters with the help of dogs, different signs and evidence to look for when tracking and how you can teach your dog to track as well.

If you have a story that would be of value to the Silvercore audience, or know someone who does, email us at podcast@silvercore.ca.  We would love to hear from you!

If you know someone who would enjoy our podcast or YouTube videos, or anything else that Silvercore offers please share it with them.  Please engage us with your comments, questions and suggestions likes, shares and subscriptions.  If you have a story to tell that our audience would appreciate, or know someone who does, let us know.  Your interaction will help us in providing the best possible future content.
You can listen to episode 23 of our podcast on Podbean, Apple iTunes, YouTube, Spotify, SoundCloud, Google Podcast, and Google Play. All you’ll have to do is search for ‘The Silvercore Podcast.’ 

If you have any feedback or questions that we can address, please reach out to us via social media or at 1-855-771-5837 or info@silvercore.ca. Finally, don’t forget to rate, review, and subscribe to the podcast, and while you’re at it, follow us on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter!

Travis Bader

Join the Silvercore Club!

Looking for Show Notes of this Podcast? Read them Here!

64 total views, 2 today

How to import and export firearms in Canada

Announcement January 12, 2021

Many times throughout the year Silvercore gets asked “How do I import (or export) a firearm in Canada?“. We wanted to provide you with all the in’s and out’s of importing and exporting firearms in Canada and make it smooth sailing for you to safely, and legally get your firearm into (or out of) Canada.

If you’re new to Silvercore and our Blog, be sure to check out all the other useful content we have! Be sure to subscribe to our Newsletter where you’ll find all the most relevant and new content from our YouTube Channel, Podcast, Blog, Online Courses, Gun Club and much more.


What do you need to Import (or Export) a Firearm in Canada? 

If you want to import or export your firearm, the first thing you’ll need, regardless if you are dealing with a Non-Restricted or Restricted Firearm is to be 18 years or older and you must have a valid Possession and Acquisition Licence, also known as a PAL (more firearms acronyms, terminology and what they mean can be found on our blog here). And incase you’re wondering, neither Canadian residents, nor visitors are allowed to import prohibited firearms newly acquired outside of Canada under any circumstances.  


What are the legal requirements for importing and exporting firearms?

There are a few different legal requirements which need to be followed when it comes to importing or exporting firearms. The first we’ll touch on those that relate to Canada. There are governing bodies that have their own regulations which need to be followed. In this section we will review the following:

  1. Canada Border Services Agency, or CBSA
  2. Global Affairs Canada
  3. The Criminal Code and The Firearms Act.

So let’s begin!

1. CBSA, Importing and Exporting Firearms, Weapons and Devices.

Review Memorandum D19-13-2, effective as of May 29 2019. This document not only goes over a briefing of things most recently changed, legislation, the definitions of things like Action, Ammunition, Authorization to Carry (ATC), Authorization To Transport (ATT) and more, but also describes in great detail prohibited weapons and ammunition. Knowing what is considered prohibited will save you a great deal of grief when importing or exporting a firearm.

Additionally, you’ll find the import and export procedures. But we’ll keep this simple and break it down for you!

If importing a Non-Restricted Firearm

In addition to the 18+ age and valid PAL which has the proper authorization for the class of firearm which you plan to import, you’ll also need the following:

      1. Verify if you need an import authorization from Global Affairs Canada, more on that below. 

If importing a Restricted Firearm

In addition to the 18+ age and valid PAL, you will also need the following:

      1. Be authorized owner to which the Restricted firearm is registered to with the Canadian Firearms Program, or CFP and have your Firearm Registration Certificate, 
      2. Have a Long Term Authorization to Transport, or ATT in order to Transport the firearm (this is obtained by being a member of a recognized gun club or range), 
      3. Obtain an import authorization from Global Affairs Canada.

Something worth noting is that you can generally only import a restricted firearms if you are able to show that you have a need for that firearm, this could be something such as needing it to be able to take part in an organized target-shooting event.

Ensure you are properly covered, Join The Silvercore Club!


2.  Import Controls and Import Permits handled by Global Affairs Canada

Apply for an Import Permit. In order to apply for this you’ll need to  complete an Application for Import/Export Permit EXT-1466. (you’ll need Adobe Reader to load this file)

Be sure to include your application with a cheque for the corresponding total value of goods otherwise the permit will not be issued. The fee schedule can be found here.


3. The Criminal Code and the Firearms Act.

You’ll need to keep in mind the Criminal Code and the Firearms Act as this outlines the offences you could face if you import or export a firearm illegally and who is authorized to import or export. More on this below.

 

As a final note on things you need to do, don’t forget that you will also need to keep in mind the country where the firearm is coming from, as well as any other country the firearm will pass through and their legal requirements.


What offences could be faced for importing or exporting firearms illegally?

We’ll keep the legal jargon out of this summary- if you want to read that you can find it here in the Criminal Code of Canada.

Importing or exporting knowing it is unauthorized

The punishment when it comes to a firearm is imprisonment for up to 10 years and minimum punishment of 3 years (if first offence), or of 5 years (if second or subsequent offence)

In other cases of an indictable offence,  imprisonment up to 10 years and a minimum punishment of imprisonment of one year.

Unauthorized importing or exporting

Imprisonment for up to 5 years for an indictable offence, or if guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.

Who is authorized to import and export a firearm?

As per the Firearms Act, Authorization for non-residents who do not hold a licence to import firearms that are not prohibited firearms

35 (1) A non-resident who does not hold a licence may import a firearm that is not a prohibited firearm if, at the time of the importation,

(a) the non-resident

(i) is eighteen years old or older,
(ii) declares the firearm to a customs officer in the prescribed manner and, in the case of a declaration in writing, completes the prescribed form containing the prescribed information, and
(iii) in the case of a restricted firearm, produces an authorization to transport the restricted firearm; and

(b) a customs officer confirms in the prescribed manner the declaration referred to in subparagraph (a)(ii) and the authorization to transport referred to in subparagraph (a)(iii).

So what about airguns, replica firearms, and antique firearms? Can I import / export them?

Replica firearms are prohibited from entering Canada.

A replica firearm is considered a prohibited device and here is what CBSA says about them:
  • are designed or intended to exactly resemble a firearm with near precision;
  • are not reproductions of antique firearms; and
  • may include airsoft or blank guns.

Replica firearms are classified as prohibited devices. Individuals cannot import them into Canada. For more information on replica firearms see Memorandum D19-13-2, Importing and Exporting Firearms, Weapons and Devices.

Antique firearms can be imported to Canada- conditions apply

An Antique firearm can be imported as long as it is considered to be Antique as outlined under the Criminal Code, and as long as you are a Canadian resident or a visitor to Canada.  You won’t need to register an antique firearm, and you do not need a licence if you are the owner of one, however the proper safe storage and transportation requirements will all still apply. 


What weapons or devices are prohibited from entering Canada?

*Please note that this is not an exhaustive list, but common weapons and devices prohibited from entering Canada.*

Weapons:

  • automatic knives such as switchblades;
  • centrifugal knives such as flick knives or butterfly knives;
  • gravity knives;
  • mace or pepper spray designed for use on humans;
  • nunchaku sticks;
  • shuriken (throwing stars);
  • manrikigusari or kusari (fighting chains);
  • finger rings with blades or other sharp objects projecting from the surface;
  • Taser and stun guns shorter than 480 mm;
  • crossbows designed for one-handed use;
  • crossbows 500 mm or shorter;
  • Constant Companion (belt-buckle knife);
  • push daggers;
  • devices shorter than 30 cm concealing a knife blade (e.g. knife-comb);
  • spiked wristbands;
  • blowguns;
  • Kiyoga or Steel Cobra batons (spring batons);
  • spring-loaded rigid batons (triggered by a button or lever);
  • morning stars; and
  • brass knuckles.

Devices:

  • silencers or devices designed to muffle or stop the sound of a firearm;
  • certain cartridge magazines above a given capacity. Generally, cartridge magazines are limited to 5 rounds for centre-fire, semi-automatic rifles or shotguns and 10 rounds for semi-automatic handguns, with exemptions for certain magazines;
  • bullpup stocks;
  • replica firearms (see additional information on replica firearms below); and
  • devices prohibited by regulations.

 

Can I ship firearms?

The short answer is yes. The longer answer is, under certain circumstances.
If you are shipping a firearm it must be a licensed carrier company that is designated under the Firearms Act that is handling the firearms shipped to someone in Canada.
  • When shipping, the item must be shipped in a sturdy, non-transparent container. This container should be hard to break into and should not break open accidentally during transport. 
  • There must not be any markings on the outside of the container which indicate there are firearms inside- unless the marking is an address.
  • The Canadian Firearms Program, CFP, recommends that you label an envelope “Customs Documents” and attach it firmly to the outside of the container. You can put any waybills, import permits, or export permits into the envelope.
  • You must declare all firearms at Canada Customs and pay applicable duties and taxes.

Where can updates be found relating to firearms regulations?

It’s important that as a safe, legal and responsible firearms owner you’re always staying up to date with any applicable changes. Updates can be found online the RCMP Canadian Firearms Program section of the website under ‘Highlights’.

Sometimes it depends on the updates you are looking for as to where you can locate them. If you aren’t sure, feel free to reach out to us at info@silvercore.ca
Or, if you have questions that relate to a specific firearm, weapon or device, we recommend that you contact the Canadian Firearms Program at 1-800-731-4000.

How can I learn more about firearms and firearms related Information?

There is a number of ways to find the information that you’re looking for, but for the sake of bringing you the easy access of information you may be on the look for, we would recommend any of the following.

  1. Listen to The Silvercore Podcast. The Silvercore Podcast discusses matters related to hunting, firearms, hiking, outdoor adventure and the people and businesses that comprise the community all from a uniquely Canadian perspective.
  2. Join the Silvercore Club to receive exclusive club discounts with participating retailers (some of whom sell hunting related products) – and the Silvercore Club Facebook Community. There are many individuals who hunt and have experience in  hunting who are happy to share their knowledge and all it takes is a little ask and community involvement.
  3. Take a Silvercore Online Course. Silvercore has a number of different online courses whether you’re looking to obtain your PAL, go hunting, become an RSO, or even just want to make sure you’re safe in bear country.

 

DISCLAIMER:

Please note that this post was created and intended for educational purposes and acts only as a guide and is by no means considered a legal document.

As regulations and legislation change from time to time, Silvercore and its subsidiaries make no warranties whatsoever, either express or implied, oral or written, in fact, or by operation of law or otherwise, regarding the import or export of any firearm or device mentioned throughout this post.

Individuals should always check with the appropriate governing bodies regarding legislative and regulatory specifications for the import and export of firearms into or out of Canada.

 

107 total views, 3 today

Silvercore Podcast Ep. 22: Ineffective gun control & Canadian gun ban

Announcement January 12, 2021

In this episode of The Silvercore Podcast, Travis Bader sits down with Shane Mathieson, the third generation owner of Reliable Gun in Vancouver BC. Listen in as they discuss how Reliable Gun got it’s start, the recent OIC firearms ban and how it’s affecting business as well as how COVID has impacted gun sales and more!

If you have a story that would be of value to the Silvercore audience, or know someone who does, email us at podcast@silvercore.ca.  We would love to hear from you!

If you know someone who would enjoy our podcast or YouTube videos, or anything else that Silvercore offers please share it with them.  Please engage us with your comments, questions and suggestions likes, shares and subscriptions.  If you have a story to tell that our audience would appreciate, or know someone who does, let us know.  Your interaction will help us in providing the best possible future content.
You can listen to episode 22 of our podcast on Podbean, Apple iTunes, YouTube, Spotify, SoundCloud, Google Podcast, and Google Play. All you’ll have to do is search for ‘The Silvercore Podcast.’ 

If you have any feedback or questions that we can address, please reach out to us via social media or at 1-855-771-5837 or info@silvercore.ca. Finally, don’t forget to rate, review, and subscribe to the podcast, and while you’re at it, follow us on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter!

Travis Bader

Join the Silvercore Club!

Looking for Show Notes of this Podcast? Read them Here!

69 total views, 2 today

Firearms Program Quick Links

Announcement January 12, 2021

Finding the information you are looking for when it comes to firearms licensing, buying, transporting, importing, or other areas, it can be a bit tricky at times when trying to navigate where to go and what information you need. Silvercore is here to help make this process quick and easy! Below you can find a compiled list of quick links for your ease of access on different topics for the Canadian Firearms Program rules, regulations, forms and more!

Contact the Canadian Firearms Program

Firearms Classifications (Learn about non-restricted, restricted and prohibited firearms)

Information on Firearms Licensing (Do crossbows need a licence? What is required to own a gun in Canada?)

Firearms Safety (Training requirements, instructors, exemptions)

Firearms Registration (Restricted or Prohibited Firearms)

Information for Buying and Selling (transferring) Firearms (Learn the legal ways to transfer firearms properly)

Importing and Exporting Firearms (Can you purchase a firearm in the United States and bring it into Canada or vice versa?)

Information relating to Executors and Heirs (Important information if a loved one passes away and leaves firearms in their will or estate)

Information on Shooting Clubs and Ranges (Want to build your own range on your property or understand the construction requirements?)

Firearms Forms (PAL applications, Licensing for Businesses, Registration or Transfer of Firearms, Authorizations for Transportation, Authorizations for Estates, etc)

Individual Web Services (for online PAL Renewal, PAL application Status, Firearms Registration, etc)

Business Web Services (registration of firearms, transfer of firearms, obtaining copies of registration certificates, etc)

History of Firearms in Canada (A quick background on the important dates relating to Canadian firearms ownership).

Don’t forget to check out the Silvercore Blog for other useful links and information!

 

79 total views, 2 today

Firearms and Hunting Terminology

Announcement January 12, 2021

As our country’s oldest and largest safety training business of its kind, Silvercore has trained more outdoor enthusiasts, athletes, hunters, sports shooters and armed professionals, than any other company in our sector in Canada.

As you can imagine, in Silvercore’s endeavours and experience we know very well just how confusing it can be when you are first starting your journey to obtaining licensing, whether it be for your firearms licence, hunting licence, training, permits or otherwise. 

As such, we’ve created a list of different acronyms, variations of them and terms that you may run into in the process of becoming more knowledgeable in the firearms industry to help make things much clearer for you.

PAL or P.A.L. – Possession and Acquisition Licence

This is the current form of firearms licensing in Canada and the term which is most commonly used. It can refer to a Non-Restricted Firearms and/or Restricted Firearms Licence. It was put in place in 1995 when it replaced the term FAC (more to come on this below).

RPAL or R.P.A.L. – Restricted

This is also the current form of firearms licensing in Canada and is really just another term which is somewhat interchanged with PAL.  It refers to a Restricted Firearms Licence.

POL or P.O.L. – Possession Only Licence

This is the term used for individuals with a licence in Canada which cannot obtain firearms, but only possess them. POL’s were actually transferred to PAL’s in 2015 under the Common Sense Firearms Licensing Act

FAC or F.A.C. – Firearms Acquisition Certificate

This was the old form of firearms licensing in Canada and term which is less commonly used, but still relatively known and used amongst older generations due to when it was valid (1977 – 1995). These have all now since expired and will need to be replaced by a PAL.

CFSC or C.F.S.C. – Canadian Firearms Safety Course

This is the required training set forth by the Canadian Firearms Program and RCMP for individuals to be able to obtain a Non-Restricted Firearms Licence or PAL.

CRFSC or C.R.F.S.C. – Canadian Restricted Firearms Safety Course

This the required training set forth by the Canadian Firearms Program and RCMP for individuals to be able to obtain a Restricted Firearms Licence or RPAL.

NR – Non-Restricted

This refers to a classification of a firearm and typically means long guns such as rifles or shotguns. This is not always the case however and there may be firearms which are exceptions based on barrel length, calibre discharged, etc. Specifics relating to the classification of Non-Restricted Firearms can be found on the RCMP’s website here.

R – Restricted

This also refers to a classification of a firearm and typically means firearms such as revolvers or handguns.  Specifics relating to the classification of Restricted Firearms can be found on the RCMP’s website here.

Prohib- Prohibited

This also refers to a classification of a firearm. Specifics relating to the classification of Prohibited Firearms can be found on the RCMP’s website here.

CFP- Canadian Firearms Program

The Canadian Firearms Program, also known as the Canadian Firearms Centre is a federal program which falls under the RCMP and is typically responsible for firearms licences and regulations in Canada.

CFO- Chief Firearms Officer

The Chief Firearms Officer is provincial body which is responsible for the issuance of PAL’s to individuals in that province, ATT’s, ATC’s Firearms Transfers, and Guns Show Sponsorship approvals.  There are different CFO’s per province and a list of these and their contact information can be found on the RCMP’s website here.

ATT or A.T.T. or LATT – Long Term Authorization to Transport

A Long Term Authorization to Transport is a requirement for individuals which possess a valid RPAL and wish to purchase, possess, or transport a restricted firearm.

In order to obtain an ATT, the individual meeting the requirements above, must provide proof of a valid membership with a recognized gun club or range in order to meet the requirements of the CFO.

This proof of membership is typically provided in form of a letter from your club or range which you have a valid membership with.

ATC or A.T.C – Authorization to Carry

An Authorization to Carry is a special permit issued by the CFO in your province under the Firearms Act. This permit will allow an individual to lawfully posses and carry a restricted, or prohibited firearm, which is readily accessible to them for use. This may be issued in the case of it being a requirement for your line of profession, for example, an armoured car guard may receive this permit.

WATC or W.A.T.C. – Wilderness Authorization to Carry

A Wilderness Authorization to Carry is a special permit issued by the CFO in your province under the Firearms Act. This will allow an individual to lawfully posses and carry a restricted firearm, which is readily accessible to them for use for the purpose of protection in their line of work. An example of an individual who may be eligible to apply for this permit might be a licensed professional trapper.

POP or P.O.P. – Proof Of Proficiency

A proof of proficiency is required to be completed by the Applicant that is looking to obtain a WATC. This consists of the applicant showing the administrator of the POP that they can shoot their firearm at a different distances and in different positions. They will be scored on their shots and where they placed on the target. This will determine if they’ve passed or not and will be included with their application which is submitted to the CFO for their WATC.

CORE or C.O.R.E. – Conservation and Outdoor Recreation Education

CORE is education or training related to hunting. There are currently various ways to do this including self-study, reading the CORE Manual, completing the Online CORE Hunter Education Course, or attending an in-person CORE Hunter Education Course with a BCWF certified CORE Examiner.

All of these methods go towards the same goal; obtaining your Fish and Wildlife ID (FWID) which acts as the passport to hunting in BC. Individuals will be required to complete an examination with a BCWF Certified examiner and obtain their student graduation certificate in order to proceed and obtain their FWID. Read more on this in our blog post on what you need to hunt in BC.

BCWF or BC Wildlife Federation – British Columbia Wildlife Federation

The BCWF is the provincial body which manages the CORE program, its instructors and the certifications of students whom have successfully passed their CORE examinations. They also are British Columbias leading conservation organization with core values of Stewardship, Education and Research and Partnership. Find out more about the British Columbia Wildlife Federation on their website here.

FWID – Fish and Wildlife ID

The Fish and Wildlife ID or FWID, is the passport to access hunting services in BC.  This is required in order to obtain the following:

  • Hunting licences (resident, non-resident, non-resident alien, youth and initiation)
  • Fraser Valley and Gulf Islands special area licences
  • Species and upland game bird licences
  • Limited entry hunting (LEH) licences
  • Guide outfitter licences
  • Permit to accompany a non-resident or non-resident alien to hunt big game

LEH –  Limited Entry Hunting 

Limited Entry Hunting is a random draw which provides hunters the opportunity to hunt animals which may not otherwise be huntable during the general open season. LEH applications are typically for authorizations to hunt Bison, Mule Deer, Elk, Moose, Mountain Goat, Mountain Sheep, and other B.C. game.

Regulation Synopsis

There are many different synopsis’ with regulations as they pertain to hunting, LEH, trapping, and fishing, these include the following:

  1. BC Limited Entry Hunting Regulations Synopsis
  2. BC Hunting and Trapping Regulations Synopsis
  3. BC Freshwater Fishing Regulations Synopsis

These Synopsis’ are typically released every 2 years and have important regulations in them that are important for hunters, trappers and anglers alike to follow. The BC government also updates these online so its important to check their website to make sure you have the most current and accurate information.

69 total views, 2 today

The Chasing Food Club with Jenny Ly

Announcement January 12, 2021

In this episode of The Silvercore Podcast Travis Bader sits down with Backcountry Hunters and Anglers Regional Leader, Jenny Ly about how she got into hunting, ego involved in hunting, her role as a regional leader for BHA and her direction moving forward with Chasing Food Club.

If you know someone who would enjoy our podcast or YouTube videos, or anything else that Silvercore offers please share it with them.  Please engage us with your comments, questions and suggestions likes, shares and subscriptions.  If you have a story to tell that our audience would appreciate, or know someone who does, let us know.  Your interaction will help us in providing the best possible future content.
You can listen to episode 19 of our podcast on Podbean, Apple iTunes, YouTube, Spotify, SoundCloud, Google Podcast, and Google Play. All you’ll have to do is search for ‘The Silvercore Podcast.’ 

If you have any feedback or questions that we can address, please reach out to us via social media or at 1-855-771-5837 or info@silvercore.ca. Finally, don’t forget to rate, review, and subscribe to the podcast, and while you’re at it, follow us on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter!

Travis Bader

Join the Silvercore Club!

Looking for Show Notes of this Podcast? Read them Here!12

56 total views, 1 today

The Science of Violence with Dr. Geoffrey Desmoulin

Announcement April 16, 2020

In this episode of The Silvercore Podcast Travis Bader sits down with In this episode of The Silvercore Podcast Travis Bader sits down with Spike TV’s, Deadliest Warrior Host, Geoffrey Desmoulin about how he became interested in firearms, his role as a court expert in a multitude of bio-mechanic and weapons related matters and his training program, the Science of Violence.

If you know someone who would enjoy our podcast or YouTube videos, or anything else that Silvercore offers please share it with them.  Please engage us with your comments, questions and suggestions likes, shares and subscriptions.  If you have a story to tell that our audience would appreciate, or know someone who does, let us know.  Your interaction will help us in providing the best possible future content. You can listen to episode 18 of our podcast on Podbean, Apple iTunes, YouTube, Spotify, SoundCloud, Google Podcast, and Google Play. All you’ll have to do is search for ‘The Silvercore Podcast.’ 

If you have any feedback or questions that we can address, please reach out to us via social media or at 1-855-771-5837 or info@silvercore.ca. Finally, don’t forget to rate, review, and subscribe to the podcast, and while you’re at it, follow us on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter!

Travis Bader

Join the Silvercore Club!

Looking for Show Notes of this Podcast? Read them Here!

428 total views, 1 today

Captain of the Hunt

Announcement March 14, 2020

Silvercore has several contest and giveaways running right now and here is a reminder to check out the Silvercore.ca website to learn more about the current Glock gear giveaway as well as the postal match which is free to all Silvercore members across Canada with prizes which include firearms, steel targets, accessories, courses and more. Full details on the Silvercore.ca website.

If you are enjoying the Silvercore Podcast, please do us a favour and consider subscribing, liking, commenting and leaving a review. Likewise, if there is content that you would like to see featured on a future Silvercore podcast, let us know. You can also check out the Silvercore Club Facebook page and join in the conversation.

Today I sit down with long time friend Marshall Lowen as he recounts growing up in rural Manitoba and his adventures and misadventures while hunting and trapping across Canada.

Marshall spent over 44 years serving his country as a member of the Canadian armed forces, he is a firearms instructor, hunter education instructor a proud member of Metis society and served as Vice President of the Vancouver Metis society for many years and now sits as an elder who has been bestowed with the honour and responsibility of being selected the Captain of the hunt.

You can listen to episode 14 of our podcast on Podbean, Apple iTunes, YouTube, Spotify, SoundCloud, Google Podcast, and Google Play. All you’ll have to do is search for ‘The Silvercore Podcast.’ 

If you have any feedback or questions that we can address, please reach out to us via social media or at 1-855-771-5837 or info@silvercore.ca. Finally, don’t forget to rate, review, and subscribe to the podcast, and while you’re at it, follow us on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter!

Travis Bader

485 total views, 1 today

The Silvercore Podcast Ep. 12: Intro to 3 gun and How to be a Sponsored Shooter

Announcement February 15, 2020

In this episode, sponsored 3 gun shooter Taka Kuwata takes you through the sport of 3 gun competitions as well as how to become a sponsored shooter and the duties and responsibilities surrounding sponsorship. Taka speaks about exercise and the diet that he adheres to in order to stay competitive as well as pro tips on how to properly bring your firearms across the border for competitions.

This weeks episode is brought to you by Gearpack.ca. Gearpack is a subscription based mystery box. Gearpack has partnered with some of the biggest brands in the business to bring you top quality products, delivered to your doorstep every month. Knives from esse, Spyderco, SOG and Kershaw , stoves, backpacks, watches, optics. What’s awesome, is if you can show proof of a valid Silvercore Club membership, you receive 30% off your first order. Check out Gearpack.ca for full details. At the bottom are the links and dates which were referenced in this podcast.

Travis Bader


Form6NIA Submission. imports@atf.govAML Abbotsford Multigun League 4161 Lakemount Rd, Abbotsford Instagram: @abbotsfordmultigun For match updates and Newsletters email: multigun@afgc.ca to be added to the distribution list. Match registrations available on Practice Score, Search for Abby Multigun League2020 Competition and Practice Schedule:

  • Saturday February 22 Practice
  • Sunday March 29 Match
  • Sunday April 19 Practice
  • Sunday May 31 Match
  • Sunday June 21 Practice
  • July Drop In (To be announced)
  • Sunday August 30 Match
  • Sunday September 27 Practice
  • Occasional Evening Practices (Stand by for updates on Social Media)

Taka Kuwata’s Instagram: @Taka_3gun Team White Rice Instagram: @teamwhiterice   Below is a list of sponsors for Team White Rice: Reliable Gunshttps://www.reliablegun.com/en/Milburn Mountain Defensehttps://milburnmountaindefense.ca/IBI Barrelshttps://www.internationalbarrels.com/Timber Creek Outfittershttps://timbercreekoutdoorsinc.com/Campro Bulletshttp://www.campro.ca/en/Odin Workshttps://www.odinworks.com/Drummond Shootinghttps://www.drummondshooting.ca/DS Tacticalhttps://www.dstactical.com/Vortex Opticshttps://www.vortexcanada.net/Atlas Gunworkshttps://atlasgunworks.com/Tactical Performance Center https://tacticalperformancecenter.com/

https://silvercore.ca/2020/02/12/the-silvercore-p…ponsored-shooter/

657 total views, 2 today

The Silvercore Podcast Ep. 10 – Moose Underwear and Other Hunting Stories

Announcement January 16, 2020

Episode 10 of The Silvercore Podcast is here! In this episode, we find out what happens when a group of hunters, with very different backgrounds and hunting experience, embark on a week-long shared moose hunt.

Also in this episode, Paul Ballard regales us with sage hunting advice, Rob Wilson discusses when it’s appropriate to put underwear on a moose, and Mike Welti shares an experience that no hunter wants to find themselves in, but every hunter should be prepared for.

This episode is sponsored by Carter Motorsports in Vancouver. As long-time customers of Carter Motorsports, we were very excited when they agreed to be part of this podcast. Also, a huge thanks to International Barrels, who supplied a custom barrel chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor and Vortex Optics, who provided the scope for this hunt. All together, it made for one extremely accurate hunting rig.

You can listen to episode 10 of our podcast on Podbean, Apple iTunes, YouTube, Spotify, SoundCloud, Google Podcast, and Google Play. All you’ll have to do is search for ‘The Silvercore Podcast.’ 

If you have any feedback or questions that we can address, please reach out to us via social media or at 1-855-771-5837 or info@silvercore.ca. Finally, don’t forget to rate, review, and subscribe to the podcast, and while you’re at it, follow us on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter!

Travis Bader
Silvercore Inc.

718 total views, 1 today

Pro Tips for Renewing your Firearms License

Announcement, Policy, Regulation and Law January 8, 2020

Over Silvercore’s many years of experience in teaching, training, and certifying a countless number of instructors, students, and otherwise, we’ve realized some tips and tricks which may aid those in the process of renewing their firearms license, PAL, to achieve a faster renewal.

So in this blog, we are discussing tips that may make your renewal go from tedious and lengthy to easy and renewed in no time at all!

Renew Early

Renew before your PAL expires. Why? Because if you let your PAL expire, the application process to have it reinstated is much longer. In fact, it’s the same process as when you first applied- including the 28 day waiting period! Take it from us, renew early and save yourself both time and stress.

Another item worth mentioning is that to renew, you will need to present a copy of your course reports. If you do not have a copy of your course reports, which articulate you went through the required training for your PAL, you may have to retake the CFSC/CRFSC training.

Renew Online

The good news is that you can easily renew online via the RCMP’s website, which can be found here. Online renewal ensures that your renewal gets to the RCMP promptly, but also gives you peace of mind knowing that it won’t get lost in the mail. Another bonus- you also save postage! 

In possession of restricted firearms? Have your proof of membership handy!

As a restricted firearms owner, you need a membership from a club or range to have the Long Term Authorization To Transport or ATT. This allows you to purchase, possess and transport your restricted firearms.

So, if you’re renewing your firearms licence and you currently have restricted firearms in your possession, one of the best things you can do to speed along the process is to include your proof of membership with
your renewal application to the RCMP. This saves time because then they don’t have to send you a letter telling you that they need that proof of membership for the ATT.

If you don’t have a valid membership and need one for your renewal, you can join the Silvercore Gun Club to meet the ATT requirements. Bonus: this membership not only comes with 10 Million in North American wide liability insurance, but it also has some pretty great perks, including annual members-only events with brag-worthy grand raffle prizes.

Include the right fees

Effective March 31, 2020, the Canadian Firearms Program has updated its service fees for firearms licences for individuals and businesses. The fees for each licence are as follows:

  • Individuals upgrading from PAL to RPAL $40.88
  • non-restricted firearms (PAL) $61.32
  • restricted firearms (RPAL) $81.76

Keep in mind that if you’re applying for your RPAL, this includes your PAL, so the total fee for both the non-restricted and restricted firearms is $81.76.

Check, check, and check again!

Be sure to review your application form, more than once. This will ensure that you haven’t missed any crucial details. Leave the form for a day and return to it on a new day. Fresh eyes tend to see new things, and likewise, tired eyes can miss details.

Unsure about details on your application form? Contact us! We can provide you with the information and advice you need to complete your forms and be on your merry way in no time!


Below are links references in this post that will help you with your firearms license renewal endeavour:

PAL application form: Possession & Acquisition License (PAL) Application Form

PAL application form for Aboriginal Peoples: Possession & Acquisition License (PAL) Application Form for Aboriginal Peoples

PAL renewal form: Possession & Acquisition License (PAL) Renewal Application Form

Online application status check: Possession & Acquisition License (PAL) Application Status

798 total views, 1 today

The Silvercore National Pistol Shoot – Why It Was Created

Announcement November 29, 2019

Many of you may already know our story, but for those of you who don’t we wanted to provide you with more of a background as to who we are, why we started the Silvercore Gun Club and our intention behind the launch of our Silvercore National Pistol Shoot. 

The Beginning 

Silvercore started as a sole proprietorship over 20 years ago and then fully incorporated in 2003. The name Silvercore came from our founder’s grandparents, “Silver” Armeneau, and “Core” Cornelius Bader. Armeneau earned his living as a travelling motorcycle daredevil before becoming a decorated WWII veteran, and finally a Vancouver Police Detective. Bader immigrated from the Netherlands and became a successful entrepreneur, running Bader’s Dutch Cookies. To this day, Silvercore holds the core values of our namesakes. 

Silvercore was the first company of it’s kind in Canada, delivering high-quality instruction to the general public as well as maintaining contracts with government and private industries in the fields of firearms training, consulting, program creation, and countrywide gunsmithing. Silvercore also created a sub-section of the company called the Silvercore Gun Club.

Why We Started The Silvercore Gun Club 

The Silvercore Gun Club was born out of Silvercore’s desire to create a community of outdoors enthusiasts brought together by their love and enjoyment of shooting sports.

The club aims to unite the firearms community and to be a place of knowledge, as it shares industry-related updates and events to its members. The club also provides the valuable service of ensuring members keep up to date and in compliance with firearms legislation. This insurance allows affiliates to enjoy their desired shooting activities in a social environment while supporting different ranges across Canada. 

Over the years, the club has grown to where we now offer insurance, a multitude of services, as well as nation-wide club sanctioned events for all of our members to participate in. The Silvercore National Pistol Shoot is an exciting milestone that our members all across Canada are able to participate in. 

Why We Launched The Silvercore National Pistol Shoot 

Previously, all of our events have been local to British Columbia and we received feedback that members across Canada also wanted to partake in Silvercore activities even though they live outside B.C. 

Knowing this, we tailored the Silvercore National Pistol Shoot to be a mail-in event accessible to all of our members. This event, like all of our in-person events, includes a sense of community, friendly competition, and prizes. The only requirement we ask is that participants are members of our Silvercore Gun Club community. If you are not currently a member, you can register here.

We have a variety of items to giveaway for this event that have generously been donated by companies such as Drummond ShootingPoco Military & Kent OutdoorsDlask Arms, and Reliable Gun. Participants have a chance to win items such as:

  • Post Topper Target Hangers
  • A 6″ AR500 Round Target 
  • A Glock G19 Gen 4 9MM
  • A Carbon Fibre 10-22 Barrel
  • A Smith & Wesson M&P 2.0 9MM

The Finer Details

For all match conditions, including a full list of prizes, requirements, and targets required, please review the entire Entry & Rule Book and Entry Form. We look forward to reviewing your submissions and awarding the winners, best of luck!

719 total views, 1 today

The Silvercore Podcast Ep. 4 – Now You See Me Now You Don’t

Announcement October 30, 2019

In this episode, we sit down with Guy Cramer, owner of HyperStealth Biotechnology Corp. In 2011, Cramer developed, ‘Quantum Stealth.’ This technology bends light around the target and will change the camouflage game. Take a listen to learn more!

You can listen to our podcast on PodbeanApple iTunesYouTubeGoogle Podcast, and apps on your phone such as Spotify, SoundCloud, and Google Play! All you’ll have to do is search for ‘The Silvercore Podcast’

After you listen, let us know what you think! While you’re at it follow us on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter!

Travis Bader
Silvercore Inc.

815 total views, 1 today

The Silvercore Podcast Ep. 3 – The Man Who Refused To Wear Pants

Announcement October 30, 2019

In this episode, we sit down with Murray ‘DOC’ Gardner. Gardner has 40 years of experience in competitive pistol shooting and is also one of the co-founders of the International Practical Shooting Confederation (IPSC) in Canada.

You can listen to our podcast on PodbeanApple iTunesYouTubeGoogle Podcast, and apps on your phone such as Spotify, SoundCloud, and Google Play! All you’ll have to do is search for ‘The Silvercore Podcast’

Take a listen and let us know what you think, and while you’re at it follow us on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter!

Travis Bader
Silvercore Inc.

877 total views, 1 today

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Sponsored Links

  • How to import and export firearms in Canada

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  • Firearms Program Quick Links

    by on January 12, 2021 - 0 Comments

    Finding the information you are looking for when it comes to firearms licensing, buying, transporting, importing, or other areas, it can be a bit tricky at times when trying to navigate where to go and what information you need. Silvercore is here to help make this process quick and easy! Below you can find a […]

  • What do you need to go fishing?

    by on January 12, 2021 - 0 Comments

    So you want to go fishing? With modern technology and the internet, sometimes finding the information you need that can be considered reliable and trustworthy can be difficult. This is why Silvercore is here to guide you through what you need to go fishing. First, decide what type of fishing you want to do. By […]

  • How to get a gun in Canada

    by on January 13, 2021 - 0 Comments

    So you want to get a gun and go shooting at the range, or maybe you want to go hunting, or get into competition shooting. It can be tricky to navigate what is legally required of you to get a gun in Canada. First thing’s first, you need a firearms licence. There are many terms […]

  • Firearms and Hunting Terminology

    by on January 12, 2021 - 0 Comments

    As our country’s oldest and largest safety training business of its kind, Silvercore has trained more outdoor enthusiasts, athletes, hunters, sports shooters and armed professionals, than any other company in our sector in Canada. As you can imagine, in Silvercore’s endeavours and experience we know very well just how confusing it can be when you […]

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